"It was a me outside of me... it was me in a form that shouldn't have been me!"

The Gate and The Mirror

In The Mirror on March 22, 2011 at 4:49 am

THE GATE: an indicator of the two worlds: reality and fantasy… by making the sound yes, yes, no, no it puts us into un uncertain feeling of not knowing what’s real and what’s NOT?!? A FEELING OF MYSTERY AND SUSPENSE… IS THIS ONLY A BAD DREAM?


A GATE: symbol of entering a word of mystery…

“I fixed my girp on the sword, and turned in that direction.  In a heartbeat, I tried to beam of my flashlight there.  It was a spot on the wall next to the SHOE RACK…  AND there I WAS!  That is to say it was a MIRROR!!!  There was nothing there except my own image reflecting back at me.  The Mirror musth have been just installed!  I felt immensely relieved and stupid at once.”

Below is an outline of which scenes we could include in the filming process:

START : DISTURBING NOISE OF THE BROKEN GATE
VERY DARK, CLOUDY SKY, HEAVY ATMOSFERE, STRONG BLOWS OF WIND IN THE BACKGROUND

BED SCENE: THE CHARACTER WAKES UP AND FRIGHTENED ACNOWLEDGES THE ABNORMAL AMBIENCE AROUND HIM, SOMETHING ISN’T RIGHT…

SUSPENCE, MYSTERY

WALKING IN THE CORRIDOR, LIGHTING HIS WAY WITH THE TORCH
SEEING REFLECTION IN THE MIRROR

REALISING ITS ONLY HIM
RELAX
LIGHTING UP A CIGARETTE
HAVING A LONG PUFF
LOOKING AGAIN IN THE MIRROR

SCARED AGAIN!!! IT’S NOT HIM!!!
THE REFLECTION TAKES CONTROL OVER HIS BODY
HE REALISES THE REFLECTION HATES HIM!
DISTORTED REFLECTION, AN IMAGE OF ICEBERG, FREEZING ATMOSFERE, HATRY

HE MANAGES TO COLLECT HIS STREANGHT, HE DROPS THE CIGARETTE, SMASHES THE SWARD INTO THE MIRROR

SMASHED MIRROR, PIECES FLYING IN SLOW MOTION, GLASS FLIES IN THE AIR
EVERYTHING LIGHTS UP, CLEAR SKY, IT’S A DAY
THE GATE STILL BROKEN, YES, YES, NO, NO…

at the end we can add ” the funny thing is … there was never any mirror there!”

Scenes Visualisation through the Model Making and Photographing and Drawings.

In The Mirror on March 22, 2011 at 4:44 am

We have made a series of small size set models and hand drawings and collages in order to visualise the story’s plot .  The models are based on the descriptions of the short narrative.  First, we have identified SEVEN main scene locations:

1. THE GROUNDS OF THE SCHOOL and the presence of a broken, NOISE MAKING GATE.  The atmosphere is described as a windy, humid, pitch black night with TYPHOON on it’s way.

2. CARETAKER’S ROOM: this is the place where the character is resting between his night time checks.  There is a bed and alarm clock in the room.  That particular night when he wakes up for his second round check, at 3.00am, he has trouble getting out of bed, and he has a strong sense of something wrong just about to happen.

3.  CORRIDOR SCENE: the character is doing his second round around the school, it’s very dark and he feels uncomfortable; he walks much faster than usually… This scene is very tense almost unreal.

4.  MIRROR / REFLECTION SCENE: the character notices something unusual with “the corner of his eye”, like if something was behind him but he wasn’t sure what was it?  then he realises it’s only his reflection in the mirror.

5. SMOKING SCENE: the character had a smoke in front of the mirror.

6. MIRROR BREAKING SCENE: the character gets scared of the reflection and in a moment of panic he smashes the mirror with his kendo sword and runs back to his room.

7. NEXT DAY: a scene showing the cigarette in the spot of last nights incident but there is NO MIRROR!

The Bed Scene in The Caretaker’s Room (by Katrina)

Collage of the Bed Scene

Drawing of the Foot Steps in the Corridor (by Jei)

Model of The Corridor Scene (by Katrina)

Hand Drawing of The Corridor Scene (by Charlie)

Model of The Mirror Scene/ Reflection in the Corridor (by Katrina)


Drawing of the Mirror Scene (by Charlie)

Model of the Figure Appearing in the Corridor (by Katrina)

A model of The Watchman in the Corridor (by Katrina)

Drawing of the Watchman in the Corridor (by Jei)

Drawing of the Corridor (by Charlie)

A Model of the Character’s reflection in the mirror (by Katrina)

Photography of the Characters reflection in the Mirror

Drawing of the Smoking / Mirror Reflection Scene (by Charlie)

Drawing of the last Scene (by Charlie)

“Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman.” – book reviews

In Added by Katrina Kocialkowska on March 11, 2011 at 1:53 am

“As in his novels, Murakami’s central fascination is with the essential strangeness and unfathomability of life. (…) In story after story, seemingly ordinary people relay instantly engrossing histories — often through a writer named Murakami — that turn on coincidence or surreal elements and blur the line between dreams and reality.” –Heller McAlpin, Christian Science Monitor

“In Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, the 25 stories juxtapose the deeply bizarre with the mundane to evoke fleeting moods of sadness, hope, nostalgia, and dread.” –Jennifer Reese, Entertainment Weekly

“In many of these stories, narrative tension is prolonged by a refusal to explain (…..) The stories in this collection have all of Murakami’s characteristic strangeness, but they combine the strangeness with structure. They show him at his very best; not as a cult novelist but as a really first-rate writer of short fiction. (…) The lasting effect is not that of a Japanese writer trying to write about the west, but of a writer whose relationship with his own culture is as complex, strange and powerful as the stories he creates.” –Tobias Hill, The Guardian

“If Murakami’s novels are grand enigmas, his stories are bite-sized conundrums. (…) The great pleasure of the new story collection, Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, is watching Murakami come at his obsessions from so many different angles. There’s a panoply of strangeness between these covers (…..) This collection shows Murakami at his dynamic, organic best. As a chronicler of contemporary alienation, a writer for the Radiohead age, he shows how taut and thin our routines have become, how ill-equipped we are to contend with the forces that threaten to disrupt us.” – Antoine Wilson, The Los Angeles Times

“Whatever the sources of their inspiration, the stories inBlind Willow, Sleeping Woman are nothing like a serious critical evaluation of a national identity. These stories are a succession of disparate and abstracted discontents that do not add up to a political position. A protest against the universe is a pre-political protest, crippled by its own generality, best carried out by teenagers and lunatics. What redeems Murakami’s writing from its puerility is its aestheticism: its haunting imagery, its credible voices, its allegorical play, its skill for surprise.” – Chloë Schama, The New Republic

“Haruki Murakami’s fictional world is extraordinary, but within the indisputable and beguiling weirdness that lurks below the casual-seeming surface, there is often a core that is disappointingly commonplace or even banal. (…) Too many stories use loneliness as a predictable plot device rather than a discovery about feeling. Characters have off-the-peg existential crises, resulting in sweating and vomiting for men, and silent tears and shoulder-shaking sobs for women.” – Tom Deveson, The Sunday Times