"It was a me outside of me... it was me in a form that shouldn't have been me!"

Cinematography

This is a space where we will be sharing our new acquired knowledge in the area of Cinematography.

The term Cinematography is from Greek roots meaning “writing with motion”.  At the heart of it, filmmaking is shooting – but cinematography is more than the mere act of photography.  It is the process of taking ideas, actions, emotional subtext, tone and all other forms of non-verbal communication and rendering them into rendering them in visual terms.  As is discussed in the first chapter, cinematic technique is the entire range of methods and techniques that we use to add layers of meaning and subtext to the “content” of the film – the dialog and action.

Mise en scène : Mise-en-scène is a French term and originates in the theater. It means, literally, “put in the scene.” For film, it has a broader meaning, and refers to almost everything that goes into the composition of the shot, including the composition itself: framing, movement of the camera and characters, lighting, set design and gen eral visual environment, even sound as it helps elaborate the composition. Mise-en-scène can be defined as the articulation of cinematic space, and it is precisely space that it is about. Cutting is about time; the shot is about what occurs in a defined area of space, bordered by the frame of the movie screen and determined by what the camera has been made to record. That space, the mise-en-scène, can be unique, closed off by the frame, or open, providing the illusion of more space around it.

The focus pull (AKA rack focus)is a creative camera technique in which you change focus during a shot. Usually this means adjusting the focus from one subject to another.


Montage is a technique in film editing in which a series of short shots are edited into a sequence to condense space, time, and information. It is usually used to suggest the passage of time, rather than to create symbolic meaning

A jump cut is a transition between two shots which appears to “jump” due to the way the shots are framed in relation to each other. Jump cuts are usually caused by framing which is quite similar

 


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: